Category Archives: Uncategorized - Page 2

Glossary of NSGIC Acronyms

When it comes to the use and abuse of acronyms, NSGIC takes a backseat to no one.  Recognizing that not everybody, particularly new members and new attendees to our conferences, will understand all of the acronyms flying around, the Membership Services Committee has created a glossary for members and conference attendees to use.  Simply go to the website and use a find command to learn what that acronym meant.  The glossary will be updated as needed, particularly prior to the two annual conferences.

: http://www.nsgic.org/public_resources/NSGIC_Acronym_List_070815.pdf

Final Report from the National Address Database Summit is Available

If you have been to any NSGIC meeting, or have read the April 13th post on the National Address Database Summit meeting in Linthicum, Maryland, you will know that realizing the development of a publicly accessible National Address Point Database (NAPD) with X and Y coordinates, is a very high priority for the National States Geographic Information Council (NSGIC) and many others. Nearly all government service delivery requires a NAPD, and creating one will significantly reduce government duplication of effort and waste.

The final report from the National Address Database Summit meeting is now available at this link.  You can also find more information on the Summit Meeting, including the presentations, at this link.  NSGIC appreciates the efforts of the U.S. Department of Transportation to host this meeting and work on this important initiative.

NHAP partnership videos on new NSGIC YouTube Channel

Jim Lacy (Wisconsin) has posted a couple of videos to YouTube concerning the National High Altitude Photography Program (NHAP) partnership program.   These videos, shown at a recent National Digital Orthoimagery Program (NDOP) meeting, help the viewer to understand the importance of coordination and partnerships to develop consistent, reliable and standardized imagery across the conterminous United States for the benefit of all common uses, needs and data collection.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfQelVegphjQsH7mr9GNUUw/videos

Thanks to Mike Vanhook, NSGIC Membership Services co-chair for setting up a NSGIC YouTube channel, one more effort to provide everyone with a richer membership experience.

Texas Flooding Reveals Poor Notification System

This article describes the challenges of getting notices out to the right people in the right places at the right time about dangerous conditions in their area.

http://www.govtech.com/dc/articles/In-Wake-of-Texas-Floods-Experts-Concede-High-Tech-Warning-Systems-Flawed.html

Cyber Archaeologists using Photogrammetry

I heard this piece on NPR and thought it was pretty darn cool!  They’re collecting crowd-sourced images and photogrammetry techniques to re-create sites and artifacts destroyed in the Middle East.

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2015/06/01/411138497/cyber-archaeologists-rebuild-destroyed-artifacts

NSGIC Attends First-Ever White House Mapathon

20150521_165153140_iOSOn Thursday May 21st, 2015 I attended the first-ever “Mapathon” event hosted by the White House (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHQh68bXDqg ).  Not only was it a tremendous honor to represent NSGIC, it was a personal experience I will not soon forget.  The event took place in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House grounds.  In attendance were a variety of federal agencies, non-profit groups, some international representatives and a very small number of for-profit companies.

The goal of the event was to “…celebrate and actively participate in Open Mapping.”  Open mapping is sometimes referred to as crowd mapping or crowdsourced mapping.  The White House invite I received stated, “…geospatial data has been a key component of the Administration’s Open Data initiatives” and promoted the Map Give project (http://mapgive.state.gov/why-map/ ) as a starting point for presentations and discussion.  There has been tremendous success in open mapping efforts during and after disasters, which is one reason the White House is keen on promoting it.  Examples of successful crowd mapping are the Haiti earthquake in 2010, Ebola outbreaks in West Africa, Philippines, and Nepal disasters.

The White House held the event to raise awareness of open mapping in the United States, and to grow the number of volunteer mappers.  Attendees had the opportunity to engage in one of three mapping activities.  Mapgive, Power Service Area Mapping (a program under development by the Dept. of Energy), and Every Kid in a Park (an initiative that will improve facility information on public lands that have educational activities for kids) were three project areas in which attendees could participate.

I commend the White House for bringing attention to open mapping and the benefits that collaborative crowd mapping provides.  Having a spotlight on the subject certainly raises the conversation significantly.  Open mapping has many positives and why it is attracting a lot of attention, but it does have some drawbacks.  For example, it would be difficult to crowd map cadastral (property ownership) or elevation data.

Increasingly, GIS coordinators and professionals are facing real questions about the benefit and limitations of open mapping.  NSGIC must understand these issues and how authoritative government datasets (e.g. address points, cadastral) can co-exist with open mapping initiatives.   This fall during our annual conference in Kansas City (http://www.nsgic.org/2015-nsgic-annual-conference ) I expect some significant discussions to take place on open mapping.  I’m inviting you all to attend and engage in that discussion.

Chris Diller – WI, NSGIC President-Elect

PEW Open Data study

The PEW Center for Research published an excellent study last month that analyzed public attitudes around Open Data.  It’s an excellent report and you can glean the highlights from the Executive Summary at the beginning.

http://www.pewinternet.org/files/2015/04/PI_OpenData_042115.pdf

If you believe, as I do, that Open Data is a very important movement for us to align with and pay attention to as Geospatial Professionals, it will be clear from this report that there is a pretty considerable gap that needs to be closed.  Awareness of open data and its benefits is low.

Portland students work with local law enforcement to map crime

Another good example of benefits to citizens gained through the use of GIS:

http://www.govtech.com/public-safety/Portland-Police-Graduate-Students-Join-Forces-to-Map-Crime-Hotspots.html

New app for 911

A developer created an app that sends location info directly to your local dispatch – I want to find out more about it!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/innovations/wp/2015/04/30/my-injured-father-lay-freezing-for-hours-when-his-911-call-didnt-go-through-heres-how-im-fixing-911/?wpisrc=nl_innov&wpmm=1

911 App to Curtail Overuse

Long Beach worked with Code For America to develop this app that helps to identify addresses from which 911 calls are most frequently made, making response more efficient and targeted.  They indicate interest in being used in other cities.

http://www.govtech.com/dc/articles/Long-Beach-Curtails-911-Overuse-With-App.html

Smart Markers

This is a very interesting article that describes an excellent idea to make older technology more useful and interoperable with new tech.

http://www.govtech.com/fs/Smart-Markers-Connect-Madison-Wis-to-the-Internet-of-Things.html

How well do you know the American landscape?

This is an intriguing quiz…I got 7/7.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/04/02/map-quiz-how-well-do-you-know-the-american-landscape/?wpisrc=nl_wnkpm&wpmm=1

GIS in new territory?

The image in the article says it all:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/04/07/a-new-landscape-for-google-maps-the-human-body/?wpisrc=nl_wnkpm&wpmm=1

National Address Database Summit Recap

Realizing the development of a publicly accessible National Address Point Database (NAPD) with X and Y coordinates, is a very high priority for the National States Geographic Information Council (NSGIC) and many others. Nearly all government service delivery requires a NAPD, and creating one will significantly reduce government duplication of effort and waste.

We saw the beginning of the process at the National Address Database Summit that was held last week at the Maritime Institute facilities in Linthicum, Maryland. It was sponsored by the USDOT with input from the U.S. Census Bureau during the planning stages. Participants from every sector were invited to attend this event and to engage in the facilitated discussions designed to identify the business case; governance and partnership issues; outreach and communication; and the technology that will be required to effectively develop and maintain a NAPD. Facilitation was provided by a team of expert facilitators provided by Applied Geographics and the Lead Alliance. They will also be drafting reports to detail the outcomes of the discussions.

The composition of the attendees was critical to the success of this meeting, because it represented the range of stakeholders that must be at the table. In addition to the 25 observers to the process, there were 10 Federal, 16 state, 17 local, and 2 tribal government representatives. They were joined by 8 private companies and 5 nonprofit/trade organizations that all have a vested interest in the development of a NAPD.

The event started with welcoming comments from Steve Lewis (USDOT GIO), Richard McKinney (USDOT CIO), Rolf Schmitt (Dep. Director, USDOT Bureau of Transportation Statistics), and Ivan Deloatch (Staff Director, FGDC). They each provided their thoughts on the value of a NAPD and the status of current efforts, ranging from the state of the current bureaucracy, to the highly personal experience of McKinney who, as a young man had to walk out into a foggy night to flag down a lost ambulance responding to his father’s heart attack. McKinney’s level of commitment was clearly demonstrated when he said that “if the participants of the Summit can figure out the identified issues, he would use the authority of his office to make it happen.”

Before the breakout sessions began, the participants were exposed to many of the diverse business requirements for a NAPD ranging from the reporting requirements for mortgage banks, to the services provided by the public safety answering points (PSAPs or 9-1-1 Call Centers) that send police, fire and ambulance crews to your front door as quickly as possible. The messages were clear. We all need a National Address Point Database to sustain business requirements and to ensure the safety of our loved ones.

It was noted that the end goal is clearly achievable, because it has already been accomplished in the United Kingdom and Denmark. Open Addresses was cited as a successful example, while noting that it may not be a sustainable model and that government must provide the appropriate leadership. We also know that several state address programs are in-place to coordinate the development of statewide address point databases.

Now we must come together to sustain this effort, and then finish the job in the U.S. Based on initial reports from the participants, we are well underway. The draft report from the Summit is expected by May 8th. The organizers of this event will provide their comments and the report will be finalized ten days later.

Has spring sprung?

This is certainly pertinent this time of year!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/04/08/15-gorgeous-satellite-maps-show-when-spring-will-really-arrive-in-your-area/?wpisrc=nl_wnkpm&wpmm=1