Author Archives: Karen Rogers

Open Data Leader Waldo Jaquith Heads to 18F

Some of you who attended the 2015 midyear may remember Waldo Jaquith as our keynote speaker.  It appears he’s moving up in the world!

Article on Waldo Jaquith

GovTech Article on New Government Uses for GIS

This article talks about the innovative ways GIS is being used to engage citizens by their local governments and to improve government services.  It’s a good read.

Jack Dangermond Shares Vision of the Future

This article summarizes a speech in which Jack Dangermond weighs in on how GIS can help make better decisions for the future.  Good food for thought!

Revolutionizing Outdated but Promising Government Mapping Tools

This is a very interesting article about AmigoCloud, a new company who appears to offer an alternate approach to GIS for government users.  I found the last point about the format open data is made available most noteworthy, and it should be kept in mind for the NAD.

 

Chicago Unveils OpenGrid Map System

The web application described here developed for the city of Chicago sounds very user friendly and worth checking out…

Chicago Unveils OpenGrid Map System

What Maps Really Say

NPR did this piece about maps and cartography, highlighting the fact that for a map there’s just as much value (if not more) in the reflection of what’s important to the cartographer than their purpose of navigation.  I’d love to tour the map collection they reference at the Library of Congress!  Perhaps NSGIC could arrange a tour one of these days…

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/14/457411671/map-is-an-exquisite-record-of-the-miles-and-the-millennia

Addresses on the Reservation

I heard this piece on public radio this morning:

http://www.npr.org/2015/11/02/452824825/navigating-navajo-nation-soon-to-be-easier-for-amazon-ambulances

Augmented Reality Sandbox video

We should ask them to come to one of conferences and let us play with this.  Imagine what classrooms could so with this technology!

MAPPS Privacy Guidelines Endorsement

The National States Geographic Information Council (NSGIC) Board of Directors unanimously endorsed recent guidelines produced by the Management Association for Private Photogrammetric Surveyors (MAPPS).  The guidelines outline best practices for citizen privacy and geospatial data.  The MAPPS guidelines, adopted by their organization in July, are designed to provide a self-regulatory framework for its collection of private firms engaged in geospatial technologies and data.   They are intended to provide guidance on when companies should seek individual consent for gathering geospatial data and when such data are not breaching privacy concerns and will serve public good.  It addresses such issues as geospatial data derived from aerial imagery and drawing the line at not collecting real-time, personally identifiable data.

The NSGIC endorsed the common-sense guidelines during their August Board meeting. NSGIC President Shelby Johnson is quoted as saying, “I’m very proud that our board acted in unison on this endorsement. We totally agree with MAPPS on this issue, and it’s very important for the industry as a whole and those of us in government to be on the same page.”  This builds on NSGIC’s existing policy about what data should be considered private and what isn’t.   State Geographic Information System (GIS) coordinating councils have recognized the complexity of the issue surrounding privacy for citizens.  At the same time, enormous societal benefits can be gained by leveraging GIS technologies and data.  The MAPPS guidelines are straightforward and should be applied equally across the private and public sectors.

Texas Flooding Reveals Poor Notification System

This article describes the challenges of getting notices out to the right people in the right places at the right time about dangerous conditions in their area.

http://www.govtech.com/dc/articles/In-Wake-of-Texas-Floods-Experts-Concede-High-Tech-Warning-Systems-Flawed.html

Cyber Archaeologists using Photogrammetry

I heard this piece on NPR and thought it was pretty darn cool!  They’re collecting crowd-sourced images and photogrammetry techniques to re-create sites and artifacts destroyed in the Middle East.

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2015/06/01/411138497/cyber-archaeologists-rebuild-destroyed-artifacts

Portland students work with local law enforcement to map crime

Another good example of benefits to citizens gained through the use of GIS:

http://www.govtech.com/public-safety/Portland-Police-Graduate-Students-Join-Forces-to-Map-Crime-Hotspots.html

New app for 911

A developer created an app that sends location info directly to your local dispatch – I want to find out more about it!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/innovations/wp/2015/04/30/my-injured-father-lay-freezing-for-hours-when-his-911-call-didnt-go-through-heres-how-im-fixing-911/?wpisrc=nl_innov&wpmm=1

911 App to Curtail Overuse

Long Beach worked with Code For America to develop this app that helps to identify addresses from which 911 calls are most frequently made, making response more efficient and targeted.  They indicate interest in being used in other cities.

http://www.govtech.com/dc/articles/Long-Beach-Curtails-911-Overuse-With-App.html

Smart Markers

This is a very interesting article that describes an excellent idea to make older technology more useful and interoperable with new tech.

http://www.govtech.com/fs/Smart-Markers-Connect-Madison-Wis-to-the-Internet-of-Things.html